Caroline Aiello and Jordan Pollard Present at Wisconsin Association for Talented and Gifted

Caroline Aiello and Jordan Pollard Present at Wisconsin Association for Talented and Gifted
Posted on 10/11/2019
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This month, the Wisconsin Association for Talented & Gifted held their annual conference, “Revolutionizing the Basics: Making education WORK for Gifted Students.”  The conference provides school administrators, teachers, university faculty, and parents of gifted children with two days of workshops and presentations centered around enhancing learning environments for students. 

Caroline Aiello, the District’s Curricular Lead for Gifted, Creative, and Talented (GCT) programming attended the conference along with Franklin Elementary School teacher, Jordan Pollard.  According to Aiello, “We wanted to share how we have implemented Project Based Learning in all content areas and how this framework has increased student achievement and engagement.”

Aiello and Pollard shared how Deeper Learning Competencies (e.g., Content Mastery, Effective Communication, Critical Thinking & Problem Solving, Collaboration, Self-Directed Learning, and Academic Mindset) go hand in hand with Project Based Learning. They discussed how Project Based Learning is used to meet the needs of GCT students and their classmates.

“Over 25 people attended our session and Districts across the state requested the opportunity to come visit Franklin Elementary School to observe our Project Based Learning in action.  We were proud of the opportunity to present to our colleagues,” added Aiello.

About Wisconsin Association for Talented and Gifted:
In 1971, then State Superintendent of Public Instruction, William Kahl, appointed an advisory committee to study recommendations of the gifted and talented in Wisconsin schools.  Several years later, a state statute establishing Programs for the Gifted and Talented “provide access to an appropriate program for pupils identified as gifted or talented” was enacted in 1987.

Today, Wisconsin Association for Talented and Gifted  (WATG) has served as the voice for parents, educators and community leaders concerned with the appropriate programming for gifted and talented students.  Their advocacy work raises awareness of gifted students and their learning needs at the individual, school, district and state levels. WATG also provides teaching materials for individuals and groups working to improve gifted education programs and services.